General FAQs

In Colorado, you are eligible to vote in the general election if you:

  • will be 18 years of age or older at the time of the general election (i.e. if you will be age 18 or older by 11/3/20)
  • are a United States citizen,
  • have resided in Colorado 22 days immediately before the election (10/13) at which you intend to vote, AND
  • are not currently serving a sentence of confinement or detention for a felony conviction.

You can register to vote in Colorado in one of the following ways:

  1. Online (requires a valid Colorado driver’s license, ID, or a social security number). You can register to vote online using the Colorado Secretary of State’s website.
  2. Mail, Fax, or Email - Fill out and sign the Colorado voter registration application Print, sign, and return the form to your county clerk and recorder’s office. A list of all county clerk and recorder’s offices in the state of Colorado can be found here.

You can register to vote any time before or on Election Day. If you register to vote by mail or online through www.govotecolorado.com on or before October 26, the clerk will automatically mail you a ballot. However, if you register after October 26, you must visit one of the Voter Service and Polling Centers in your county to get a ballot.

You can look up your registration status on the Secretary of State’s website. You can also update your voter registration to change your voting/mailing address, party affiliation, etc.

Click here to look up your party affiliation. If you have a Colorado driver's license or ID, you can update your party affiliation on this website. If you do not have a Colorado driver's license or ID, you can change your party affiliation by completing this form and returning it to your county clerk via mail, fax, or email. If you cannot locate your voter registration record, please contact your county clerk and recorder's office.

Yes. All counties require that you attach postage to your ballot before mailing it back. However, this amount may vary between counties. If you have questions about how much postage to affix to your mail ballot, contact your county clerk and recorder, or consult the instructions that will accompany your mail ballot.

Yes, identification IS required in order to vote in person. Colorado accepts 16 different types of IDs. Those are:

  • A valid Colorado driver’s license or valid identification card issued by the Colorado Department of Revenue. (Note:  documents issued to not lawfully present and temporarily lawfully present individuals under Part 5 of Article 2 of Title 42, C.R.S. are not acceptable forms of identification.)
  • A valid U.S. passport.
  • A valid employee identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government or of Colorado, or by any county, municipality, board, authority, or other political subdivision of Colorado.
  • A valid pilot’s license issued by the federal aviation administration or other authorized agency of the U.S.
  • A valid U.S. military identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector.
  • A copy of a current (within the last 60 days) utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the elector.
  • A Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaskan Native Blood.
  • A valid Medicare or Medicaid card issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
  • A certified copy of a U.S. birth certificate for the elector.
  • Certified documentation of naturalization.
  • A valid student identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by an institute of higher education in Colorado, as defined in section 23-3.1-102(5), C.R.S..
  • A valid veteran identification card issued by the U.S. department of veterans affairs veterans’ health administration with a photograph of the eligible elector.
  • A valid identification card issued by a federally recognized tribal government certifying tribal membership. Verification that a voter is a resident of a group residential facility, as defined in section 1-1-104(18.5), C.R.S.
  • Verification that a voter is a person committed to the department of human services and confined and eligible to register and vote shall be considered sufficient identification of such person for the purposes of section 1-2-210.5, C.R.S.
  • Written correspondence from the county sheriff or his or her designee to the county clerk indicating that a voter is confined in a county jail or detention facility.

Any form of identification listed above that shows your address must show a Colorado address to qualify as an acceptable form of identification. 

Yes. You can request a new ballot be mailed to you any time before or on October 26 by contacting your county clerk and recorder. After October 26, you must request a ballot in-person, or vote in-person, by visiting any VSPC in your county.

If you wrongly mark, deface, or tear your ballot, you have the right to receive a replacement ballot. Contact your County Clerk and Recorder before October 26th to request a replacement ballot or visit a Voter Service & Polling Center in your county before 7pm on November 3rd. Find your County Clerk and Recorder here

Yes. All voters who are registered to vote will receive a ballot in the mail for every general election so be sure that you are registered at your current address. If you are unsure whether you are registered at your current address, or you have moved, you should check your registration and update your address if necessary. Click here to check your registration.

Mail ballots will be sent to registered Colorado voters beginning on Friday, October 9. If you have not received your ballot by October 16, you can contact your county clerk and recorder to report your ballot as missing. You can also find your registration and track your ballot's status on the Secretary of State's website.

All ballots must be received by the County Clerk by 7:00 PM on Election Day, November 3, 2020. Postmarks DO NOT count. If you are returning your ballot by mail, please allow adequate time for it to be received by 7:00 PM on Election Day.

Yes, you can designate an alternate mailing address by visiting the Secretary of State’s website. You will need to enter your driver’s license number, state ID number or the last four digits of your social security number in order to update your mailing address. If you would prefer to update your mailing address by phone you can contact your county clerk. A list of all county clerk and recorder’s offices in the state of Colorado can be found here.

If you are unable to sign your name due to a physical disability, you have the right to vote without signing your name. You may use a signature stamp which does not require a witness. You may also sign with your “mark”, which does require a witness.

You have the right to assistance in casting your ballot. If you need assistance (e.g. due to a disability or a language need), you can go to a Voter Service and Polling Center. You are entitled to assistance from an election judge or a person of your choosing. The person that you choose cannot be your employer, or an agent of your employer or labor union. If you get assistance, that person must cast your vote the way you want and cannot try to tell you how to vote.

Each VSPC is required to be accessible to persons with disabilities. Designated election officials shall only select as VSPC locations sites that meet specific ADA accessibility standards, including temporary solutions during an election.

Each VSPC is required to have an accessible voting system or device equipped for individuals with disabilities. If you cannot read, see, or operate the voting machine because of a disability, you have the right to receive assistance from any individual you choose, or an election official.

Eligible voters with a disability may request to access their ballot and vote it electronically. An eligible voter must print the voter ballot, the accessible ballot application, and sign the accessible ballot application. All these materials must be returned together via USPS or dropped off at a drop box or VSPC. Contact the Secretary of States Office at 303-894-2200 or elections@sos.state.co.us to request an accessible ballot.

In the event that a VSPC is inaccessible at any time, immediately call 1-866-OUR-VOTE. You are also permitted to vote privately and independently, without any assistance. It is entirely your choice.

Visit Disability Law Colorado’s website for in-depth information and resources on this topic.

You are entitled to a ballot that your assistive technology can read. Contact your county clerk and recorder to request a ballot.

College students generally can keep their voter registration in the location where they lived prior to coming to school, or they may register in the location where they attend school. This choice is up to the student. If you choose to keep your registration at the location you lived at before coming to school, you should contact your local election official and arrange to have an absentee or mail ballot sent to you at school so that you can vote.

You cannot vote in more than one state, but if Colorado is your principal residence at this time, even if not permanent, then you can register to vote in Colorado. To register, you must be 18 years old by 11/3/20, be a US citizen, and have been a resident of Colorado for 22 days prior to the election. Colorado has same day voter registration so you and register up to and on election day.

You can vote your mail ballot that is mailed to you or in person at a VSPC in the county of permanent residence where you’re registered to vote.

The following people are eligible to register and vote in Colorado:

  • People with a past criminal conviction (felony or misdemeanor) who have completed their sentence
  • People currently in jail pretrial (pending the outcome of the criminal case)
  • People currently on probation for either a misdemeanor or a felony
  • People currently in jail serving a misdemeanor sentence only

Individuals who are presently incarcerated for a felony are currently not eligible to vote. However, they will be eligible to vote after serving their sentence. For more information about the voting rights of incarcerated or previously incarcerated individuals, visit the Colorado Criminal Justice Reform Coalition's website.

Individuals without a fixed permanent home can register to vote and cast a ballot. To register they must provide a physical address. This “home base” address can be a park, vacant lot, a business address, a shelter, or any other physical location within the county that the individual considers their home base. If the home base address does not include a mailing address, as in the case of a park or vacant lot, then the individual must provide a mailing address. The mailing address can be a post office box or anywhere else that they can receive mail.

Residents of Colorado living outside of the United States (either temporarily or permanently) who were residents of Colorado immediately before leaving the United States, and residents of Colorado who are active duty military personnel (including their spouses and voting-age dependents) and who are absent from the state on assignment are eligible to register and vote under the Uniformed and Overseas Citizens and Absentee Voting Act (UOCAVA). As a UOCAVA voter, you will have the option to receive a ballot for every election in which you are eligible to vote by mail, fax, or email.

You can register for UOCAVA in two ways:

  1. Online (requires a valid Colorado driver’s license or ID)

Look up your voter record on the Secretary of State’s website. Enter in your name, zip code, and birthdate and click “submit.” This should bring up your voter record. Under voter information, click “change my address.” Enter your Colorado driver’s license or ID number and click “submit.” At the bottom of the form, you will see “UOCAVA Status.” Indicate that you are a military voter, and how you would like your ballot to be delivered to you (mail, fax, or email). Make sure to include your fax number, email address, and/or mailing address that corresponds with the delivery option you choose.

  1. Via Mail, Fax, or Email

Complete and submit the Voter Registration and Absentee Ballot Request Federal Post Card Application. Print, sign, and return the form to your county clerk and recorder’s office. A list of all county clerk and recorder’s offices in the state of Colorado can be found here.

For more information about UOCAVA voters, visit the Colorado Secretary of State’s website.

When you are within 100 feet of a building in which a VSPC or ballot drop box is located, you have the right to vote or wait without anyone trying to influence your vote. If you witness someone trying to influence votes within 100 feet of these locations, please call the toll free Election Protection hotline: 1 866 OUR VOTE (1-866-687-8683) or the Spanish language hotline 1-888-VE-Y-VOTA (1-888-839-8682).

If you do not speak English, you have the right to receive assistance from someone who speaks your language and English.

You are entitled to assistance from:

  • An election judge who speaks English and your language;
  • Any person selected by the designated election official to provide assistance in that VSPC who speaks English and your language; or
  • Any person selected by you, provided they speak English and your language.

Any person providing assistance in this situation must sign an affirmation stating that they will not try to persuade the voter. The person providing assistance does not need to be a registered voter, a citizen or a person of any particular age.

Voters also have the right to receive ballots, instructions, and all other voting materials in Spanish in Costilla County, Denver County, and Rio Grande County.

If you do not have three (3) hours of non-work time when Voter Service and Polling Centers are open on Election Day, then you are entitled to two hours of paid leave from your job to vote on Election Day. However, you must request this time off prior to Election Day. Your employer is entitled to determine which hours you can be absent, but if you request your time off either at the beginning or end of your work shift, your employer must approve that time request.

You can also return your ballot prior to election day by mailing it with postage, or by putting it in a dropbox near you. See our homepage for a map of dropboxes near you, and their days and hours of operation.

If an Election Judge or anyone else challenges your right to vote at a VSPC, you still have the right to cast a regular ballot. If you make an oath attesting to your eligibility to vote to an Election Judge, you must be allowed to cast a regular ballot. If you don’t want to answer the questions about your eligibility, you still have a right to cast a provisional ballot.

If you are challenged or you see people being challenged at a VSPC, please call the voter hotline at 1 866 OUR VOTE (1-866-687-8683) or 1-888-VE-Y-VOTA (1-888-839-8682).

If your question or concern is not answered here, please call the the toll free Election Protection hotline: 1‑866‑OUR‑VOTE (1-866-687-8683) or the Spanish language hotline 1-888-VE-Y-VOTA (1-888-839-8682). You can also submit your question using the inquiry form on the bottom of our homepage.